From the Desk of Linda Tellington-Jones

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

My 1990 Zambia Chimpanzee Chronicles, Part IV

Impressions:

Clumps of chimps falling out of the trees following the crack of overloaded branches. The loud rustle of leaves as the chimps break off fruit. And behind the anthill, Harriet has been grunting, playing patticake, tickling, teasing, playing, and wrestling with Tober for over 30 minutes.

The sun is shifting and it’s time to move my towel another 2 feet around the tree. Uh, Oh, Chimp attack! Sandy comes up and starts playing under my towel. I’ve taken my socks and shoes off and I quickly stuff them under the towel. But Tobra rushes up and pushes Sandy away, grabbing a sock in the melee and off he triumphantly tears.

Sock tag, sock tag, off they run, up and down the trees, slapping the ground, teasing, leaping onto a branch which comes crackling down and whomp!, a chimp thumps onto the ground, leaps up and gallops off.

After ten minutes or so, the sock, stretched, chewed and slightly the worse for wear, drops out of a tree into Harriet’s territory. Got it!

I give up, pen and journal go into my pack, and I deposit it in the safe hands of Patrick. No chimp dares to take it from him. And I join Harriet in chimp wrestling. Tara has taught Harriet how to play. By gently taking Harriet’s hand in her mouth, Harriet has learned to trust her. They somersault roll, patticake, and wrestle. Sandy soon joins her and it’s two to one for the chimps.

Journaling with chimps in ZambiaI observe for a bit. It looks like too much fun to pass up, so I get into the act. Now it’s two chimps to two humans. Sandy and Tara leap on us, somersault and land upside down in our laps. I swing Sandy around by an arm and a leg and he can’t get enough. Harriet has Torah hanging by the feet and swinging. What a barrel of monkeys!

I spend a good 30 minutes carefully grooming Torah. He flattens out his belly, head resting on his arms, and loves every second of the attention. When he was playing earlier he would close his eyes, race toward me and somersault into my lap.

My 1990 Zambia Chimpanzee Chronicles, Part III

Dec. 22,Chimfunsi: 6:00 a.m. The alarm gently breaks my dream state. One hour until the chimps go into the forest. Sheila suggested we sleep in and follow them later, but we’ve come half way around the world to find this orphanage. “I can sleep when I’m dead,” Moshe used to say. I dress a little reluctantly and wake Harriet 45 minutes later. What about breakfast? “Oh” she says, “The alarm is set on Kenyan time.” I was up at 5:00 a.m.! Back into bed I climb for a short return to dreamtime.

6:45 a.m.,Zambian time, this time! Tracy and I make cheese and toast sandwiches. Add a coveted Swiss chocolate bar, hoarded until this moment.

7:05 a.m. Everyone–Sheila, David, Harriet, Tracy, Mark, Patrick and I, hoist a clinging chimp onto our hip and parade down the road into the woods. Here, all 9 chimps are set down and the adventure begins. Each day they venture into the forest for 7 hours for walks and just to scatter about, sit in the trees, relax, eat fruit and learn. Rita wants to hold my hand and tries to convince me to pick her up. But she needs the exercise. Her 30+ pounds are a lot to pack on my hip.

Chimps gallop along behind Patrick, spread out on both sides of the trail, 14 humans mixed between. They drink out of mushrooms 9 inches across, then knock them over and gallop on. Up a tree goes Coco to bring down a mouthful of orange nuts, fruit inside.

Sandy, Tara, Rita, Cora, Boo Boo, Tobas, Donna, Coco. Donna discovers a piece of burlap sack and a chase ensues. Up and down trees, over stumps, diving between close branches. “Watch out!” Tobas’ trick is to swing a branch on someone’s head.

We stop for a break after 30 minutes of walking. Some youngsters climb up a nearby ant hill and into the branches of the tree on top. Sandy hangs out with Harriet who works on his ears to help his cold. My camera comes out and I start the fun of photographing cavorting chimps.

Donna suddenly swings by and grabs our back pack which is lying against a log upon which Tracy is sitting. Tracy yells at her and makes a lunge for the pack as it is being zipped away. Tobra reacts to protect Donna by biting Tracy on the calf. Patrick leaps up and yells at him. Up the ant hill he tears. Tracy is in considerable pain. Two blue holes appear. The skin is severed over these two tooth marks, but it is not bleeding externally. Her calf is in spasm. I start TTouch, working first about six inches all around. Within 15 minutes the pain is reduced by at least half, and the wound is shrinking before our eyes. Thirty minutes later the tooth marks have disappeared and there is absolutely no discomfort!

We continue on our way through the woods.

My 1990 Zambia Chimpanzee Chronicles, Part II

To refresh your memory of the first installment of my Zambia Chimanzee Chronicles, read this post.

The chimps have met us gently, taking our hands on theirs. Sandy, one of the 14-year-o1ds, has a cold. I work on his ears and he hugs the wire and sticks his ear out to me. Cooo reaches out and grabs the money out of my pocket. Sheila rescues it just in time.

From 5-6 p.m. is the time the chimps try to break out, so David must go carefully around all the cages checking the wire. We make a tour of the 7 acre enclosure. An enormous wall surrounds it, 15 feet tall with electric wire planned for the top. There will be a lower strand of electric wire at 5 feet. The resourceful chimps will most likely break off branches and lean them against the wall to scale it. David feels that they should know the wire is electrified before they get up to 15 feet, touch it and fall back so far.

Only the gate remains to be finished, and the roof of the cement holding areas, and the wire around the top. David figures another 2 months.

The area is heavily wooded and grassed. We sit around the outside table in the twilight discussing TTouch and TTeam.

Sheila treats all the Zambians in the ranch compound (village) and is very interested in TTouch.

8:30 p.m. Darkness descends. The 9/10th full moon lights the African night. We go into the house for dinner of boiled potatoes, stew, squash and mixed veggies. And directly after, fall into bed. The generator is turned off and we wash up by the light of the kerosene lanterns. Our rooms don’t have mosquito nets. I learn the next day that malaria-carrying mozzies don’t buzz and don’t leave an itchy spot. Who knows if we’ve been bitten or not. Within the first week that Tracy arrived with Mark from England, she contracted malaria. Tracy had only been on anti-malaria tablets for a week. Same with me. Tracy’s malaria started with intense fever and dizziness. It lasted about a day, which she spent mostly sleeping and returned lightly a week later with weakness. David and Sheila get malaria frequently in spite of 16 years of anti-malaria tablets.

Upcoming Book, The Chimpanzee Chronicles, Reminds me of My Time With Chimps in Zambia

I have been communicating with Debra Rosenman, a certified Rubenfeld Synergist, and Jessica O’Donoghue, an animal behavior consultant, about my work with chimpanzees in the 1990’s. Debra and Jessica met at Kindred Spirits Animal Sanctuary in New Mexico during one of my trainings there this year, and began a conversation about Debra’s upcoming book, the Chimpanzee Chronicles. I find it so inspiring how wonderful people meet and share ideas at our trainings.

This exchange reminds me of my time in Zambia and New York City TTouching apes and monkeys. I spent only a few brief moments in passing with a beautiful baboon female under the streets of New York City at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where thousands of animals are kept for research. I can see and feel her beauty and her desperate eyes as though it were yesterday. The consciousness that was present was so clear that I wonder how we humans can be so unaware. I was at Sloan-Kettering research at the time discussing the fate of 6 pig-tailed macaques scheduled to be sold to a biomedical research center by Hunter College. I met with the veterinarians in charge of the Hunter College apes to convince them that we could offer a worthwhile life in retirement instead. (more…)

Great News!

I am pleased to announce that Tellington TTouch Training, Inc. is now approved by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork (NCBTMB) as a continuing education Approved Provider. (more…)

A Message From Debby Potts, TTouch Instructor

TTouch Instructors Debby Potts and Lauren McCall have been teaching Tellington TTouch in Japan for Companion Animals, horses and bunnies for many years. Debby was teaching a horse training in Japan when the earthquake struck and Lauren was in the air just 30 minutes from landing in Tokyo. Their on-the-spot stories that were sent out in our ENEWS on Friday, March 25th, give us a sense of being there in those historical first hours.

Animals are very important to Japanese people. I was so touched by these photos of animals living in the shelters with their people. Japan set a new precedent for the rest of the world to follow in times of crisis by allowing animals to accompany their families into the human shelters.

Authorities in charge of rescue housing must grok the need to care for our animal companions in the case of disaster as we would care for humans. Let us hold the intention that Japan will be a new model for the future for the United States and the rest of the world, so that never again will animals have to be left behind as they were during the Katrina disaster.

Please send your prayers and donations if you can. I understand there is a need for food, water and food bowls, pee pads, leashes, blankets and other supplies for all the dogs, cats, birds and other animal companions who are in shelters and may remain there for many months. By helping the animals, I know we are directly reaching out and making a difference in the lives of their guardians who love them so dearly.

My special thanks to Debby and Lauren for the spectacular work they are doing in Japan; to all the Japan TTouch Family who are reaching out to others to help in this time; and to all of you who send your prayers and donations.

Lets join our hearts and minds
with healing intention and support
sending Heart Hugs to the people and animals of Japan
with the feelings of Understanding, Gratitude, Forgiveness, and Compassion
and together, let us
Change the World,
One TTouch at a Time.

Debby Potts, Tellington TTouch InstructorMany of you know that I have been teaching in Japan for the past 17 years. I love Japan and look forward to the trips I make there every year. The time is filled with TTouch, great people and animals, and wonderful food.

My most recent trip was also filled with the events I want to share here. I was teaching a basic horse workshop on March 11 and had just started a demonstration when the ground started shaking. That happens in Japan from time to time and we waited for it to stop – except this time it just kept getting bigger! (more…)

The Great Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan: How You Can Help the Animals

The Great Earthquake

The Northeastern side of Japan suffered a major earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011. Many areas, especially the coastal towns, have been literally washed away. Though it is true that incredible numbers of people are suffering greatly from the aftermath of this unprecedented disaster, we also need to think of our animal friends. Fortunately many, many people were able to escape with their animals, but just as many were washed ashore either with their people or not . . . There are not as many animals wandering through the disaster area as compared to the Great Hanshin Earthquake. Many of the animals did not survive the tsunami. (more…)

From My Email: Memories Of Equitana

At last year’s Equitana in Essen, Germany, I had the pleasure of working with Meyke Kalms’ endurance horse Risa. She just wrote to let me know she and Risa would be there again this year. It’s a huge disappointment that I will not be able to be there.

Dear Linda,
Do you remember the Equitana 2009? My name is Meyke Kalms and we did some shows together with my horse Sonrisa del Sol, called Risa. She’s a brown mare, 11 years old and “working” on endurance races. (more…)

Josie Overcomes Aggression Toward Other Dogs With the Help of a “Stuffie”

I’m sometimes asked if I ever get tired of hearing the stories about animals whose lives are changed by Tellington TTouch® Training. The answer is a clear, “Definitely not”. The stories and feedback are what keep me inspired and passionate about sharing the work. So I would love to hear any of your stories no matter what the animals.

During the TTouch Advanced training for Companion animals in St. Paul Minnesota last year we invited several interesting dogs with extreme behavior issues to be demos for the class. The 8 year old German Shepherd, Josie came to us with her companion, Bill who just sent me this letter of thanks which i wish to share. Josie is a lovely dog with humans but 3 trainers had been unsuccessful at bringing her to a place where she could be trusted to be near another dog. With the help of  a “stuffy” in the beginning, Josie came to a point in about an hour of calmly accepting two other dogs in the room. An act that Bill had not dared to hope for. He sent a few photos to demonstrate the success. I’m including his website, the Human Chrysalis about his touching and inspiring emergence from care-giver to a new life.

(more…)

This “Bear Attack” Is the Heart-Warming Gift of Interspecies Connection

A friend forwarded this priceless email to me today. These photos touched my heart with both joy and sadness for the misunderstandings and fear that have existed between man and  so many of the 4-leggeds. This is the second case I have seen of a rescued baby polar bear bonding with a human for company. There is something special happening on this planet in terms of interspecies relationships and the more we recognize them, the more they happen. I am hoping the photographer will see my blog and give us the whole story. If any of you readers have more info as to how to contact the photographer, please let me know. In the meantime, I thank him or her for the heart-warming gift.

Bear Attack in Churchill, Manitoba, Canada

These are pictures of an actual polar bear attack.  The pictures were taken while people watched and could do nothing to stop the attack!

Reports from the local newspaper say that the victim will make a full recovery. 

polar bear attack, Changing the World One TTouch At A Time, Linda Tellington-Jones

May your troubles always be smaller than you imagine!

Profound Interspecies Connections

I’m in the process of putting together a power point presentation for two zoo presentations in September; so I thought it would be fun to share some of the pictures here with you. The first presentation is at a special evening event at the Zurich Zoo in Switzerland on September 2nd. And the second at a zoo on the east coast of Italy on the Adriatic Sea in Lignano Sabbiadoro, September 11th. The presentation is called Profound Interspecies Connections, describing special experiences with a wide variety of animals including many exotics in zoos and some wonderful experiences with horses, dogs, cats, a mouse named Ace, reptiles, birds (my McCaw who sent the neighbors hunting dog packing!) and much more . I’ve been enjoying the memories of these magical moments as I’ve been preparing for the presentation. (more…)

TTEAM Italy Scores! Congratulations Massimo & Silvia Da Re

Last year Massimo and Silvia Da Re were working with Susi Cottica, the deputy editor of “Mio Cavallo” and “Cavalli & Cavalieri” magazines regarding the publication of several articles on the Tellington Method, which they have translated. At one of the meetings in Verona they were introduced to Emanuele Anchisi, the President of LISE, the Italian League of Equestrian Sports.

LISE is a rather new association for the promotion of correct riding and respect for horses with zero tolerance for doping horses in competition. As a result of that meeting Massimo was invited to take the 2nd level examination for LISE national riding instructors.

His report on the examinations and resulting interest in TTEAM:

We were 10 candidates from all over Italy. On the first morning each of us had to ride an unknown horse and do flat work and jumping, and then give riding lessons to the others. This was followed in the afternoon by an oral exam. On the second morning we had to demonstrate our skill at building a show jumping course for different levels. In the afternoon we had the written exam and I had a huge, unexpected surprise. When the Italian Olympic Committee (CONI) delegate arrived from Rome the president of the Italian League of Equestrian Sports (LISE) asked me to explain to everybody what TTEAM is, and asked me officially to be part, as TTEAM teacher, of their academy!

Their delegate was so enthusiastic about the idea that he wants to work to make the Tellington Method recognized by CONI (the Italian Olympic Federation), and be an official tool to teach horse riding and horsemanship in Italy!

Dr. Nancy Kay’s Guidelines for Finding a Reputable Dog Breeder

In 2008 I had the pleasure of visiting with Dr. Nancy Kay when she spent a day at my horse training in Sonoma country. I was very impressed with the depth of her knowledge and her wonderful attitude. I have her permission to reprint her latest blog post on tips for choosing a dog to suit your lifestyle. It contains helpful information on adopting from a shelter or rescue organization or what you should expect from a reputable breeder if you choose that route. I’ve seen too many puppies who are mentally, emotionally or physically handicapped who caused their people much grief and expense as they matured. It’s important to make the right, informed choices. I suggest you study carefully all the points she makes about choosing a reputable breeder. There are so many breeders who do not meet the criteria listed by Dr. Kay.

In invite you to sign up to receive Dr. Kay’s blog, Speaking for Spot via email or RSS reader and buy her informative book, Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live A Happy, Healthy, Longer Life.  Here’s the article: (more…)

Dr. Nancy Kay's Guidelines for Finding a Reputable Dog Breeder

In 2008 I had the pleasure of visiting with Dr. Nancy Kay when she spent a day at my horse training in Sonoma country. I was very impressed with the depth of her knowledge and her wonderful attitude. I have her permission to reprint her latest blog post on tips for choosing a dog to suit your lifestyle. It contains helpful information on adopting from a shelter or rescue organization or what you should expect from a reputable breeder if you choose that route. I’ve seen too many puppies who are mentally, emotionally or physically handicapped who caused their people much grief and expense as they matured. It’s important to make the right, informed choices. I suggest you study carefully all the points she makes about choosing a reputable breeder. There are so many breeders who do not meet the criteria listed by Dr. Kay.

In invite you to sign up to receive Dr. Kay’s blog, Speaking for Spot via email or RSS reader and buy her informative book, Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live A Happy, Healthy, Longer Life.  Here’s the article: (more…)

Threat of Boycott May Have Postponed Shocking FEI Drug Ruling

There is a major uproar occurring in the international equestrian scene regarding the latest ruling by the FEI, that is due to be set in place in the spring, that would allow what some veterinarians view as performance enhancing drugs. Of course, the argument is that the drugs are being allowed for the health of horses.

Kim Cox Carneal and I are sitting here in Hawiian paradise (78 degrees, sunny with a balmy breeze and the soothing sound of high waves rolling up on the shoreline close enough to excite us) discussing this issue (see her blog Enlightened Horsemanship Through Touch).

So I rang my friend Kate Riordan to get more details since she and I had mused over this shocking issue yesterday. Kate found the link that is reassuring to me about the attitude of the German Equestrian Federation (FN). They are taking this rule change very seriously. In a recent statement protesting the FEI rules, FN President Brido Graf zu Rantzau mentioned the unthinkable – that the european alliance within the FEI is considering a boycott of the 2010 World Equestrian Games in Kentucky if these rules are enacted. Kate said she had read that there are already 40 countries ready to join this boycott.

In response, the U.S. Equestrian Federation asked for a delay in implementation of the rule, which was slated to go into effect Jan. 1. John Long, the USEF’s CEO, said the request also stemmed from the need to make sure all drug-testing labs used by the FEI around the world observe the same protocols, as well as the need for more education on the subject of using NSAIDs internationally. Extra time also would help the FEI sort out difficulties involving what is perceived as a ban on the use of bute in horses by some countries.

The FEI originally decided to postpone enactment until April, but under continuing pressure from a variety of nations, on Friday it contacted all its member countries asking for permission not to enact the NSAIDs rule — but rather, to schedule another vote on the matter at the general assembly next November in Taiwan.

I believe every thinking horse person who stands for fair play in horse sport should be educated on this subject of drugs.

Here is an excellent treatise by Dr. Eleanor Kellon, with many references for further study. (more…)

What We Can Learn About Phantom TTouches from A Rescued Dog: Holding the Intention of Healing and Perfection

I received a very interesting though sad and sometimes horrifying email through our TTouch® Yahoo Group from a very dedicated TTouch Practitioner trainee who works with rescue animals in Escondido California. The dog Linda Troup describes has suffered immensely. But it is my hope that this suffering will be lessened with the work that Linda is doing. Through the work of Phantom TTouch (and for those who are inexperienced in this area there is useful evidence of the effectiveness of remote healing, and as my grandfather used to say about body work for horses, “it can’t hurt”. In this way anyone interested can work to lessen the pain of all beings and improve the quality of their lives.

(more…)

Linda’s Tick Tip

I just finished a delightful week-long Companion Animal training in New Jersey with 22 enthusiastic participants from 11 states. We had lots of fascinating dogs and 2 kitties visiting us during the week. We spent some many delightful hours in the May sunshine on the grass and under the shade trees on the back lawn of the Grange working the dogs through the Playground for Higher Learning exercises – in the Labyrinth, over the balance beam and the star obstacle, over unusual footing, through cones and over ladders. It was very rich in learning experiences.

We had one little challenge, and I do mean little. The tiny deer ticks are out in full force this year in New Jersey – as well as Virginia where I had just been teaching. We made an announcement to watch for ticks for the enlightenment of participants who flew in from areas where ticks are not so prevalent. (more…)

Linda's Tick Tip

I just finished a delightful week-long Companion Animal training in New Jersey with 22 enthusiastic participants from 11 states. We had lots of fascinating dogs and 2 kitties visiting us during the week. We spent some many delightful hours in the May sunshine on the grass and under the shade trees on the back lawn of the Grange working the dogs through the Playground for Higher Learning exercises – in the Labyrinth, over the balance beam and the star obstacle, over unusual footing, through cones and over ladders. It was very rich in learning experiences.

We had one little challenge, and I do mean little. The tiny deer ticks are out in full force this year in New Jersey – as well as Virginia where I had just been teaching. We made an announcement to watch for ticks for the enlightenment of participants who flew in from areas where ticks are not so prevalent. (more…)

New Page: About Commenting Here

I have added a new page to clarify my feelings on your comments here at Changing the World One TTouch At A Time.

Here is what the page says:

Everyone on the Internet has a different idea about how to interact online. Likewise, bloggers have their own ideas about how they want discussion of their ideas to proceed.

I receive upwards of 600 emails a day. I have a lot of energy, but I’m not superhuman! I can’t possibly answer each of them. Writing this blog is a means of communicating with all of you, and generating compelling exchanges of information.

I welcome all comments and questions here. Please understand that I may not be free to respond to them all. It is possible that another reader may have something to say, so don’t forget to check the box that informs you of follow-up comments through email.

© 2009 Linda Tellington-Jones

In and Around Croatia: Our Sailing Vacation

I love flying into a small airport of Split – an hour and thirty minute flight from Switzerland, where every hectare of land is carefully cultivated with cascading flower boxes, to Croatia where the first impression is if barren, rock covered hills, weeds, and rubble on the roadside, in yards and abandoned buildings or projects as we drive north along the coast in the direction of Zadar. My impressions include poor, empty hills, no yards or landscaping, and a general struggle to survive. In this place, 90% of the economy is based on tourism (four months of the year) and the remaining 10% falls to fishing.

What a change from the countryside in Switzerland, Northern Italy and Slovenia, where we have been the last three weeks. Driving each day from the ancient city of Udine to the stable through rich fields of grain and corn and hay – a rural delight! Slovenia is like a a country in a fairytale. Each house in the country has a functioning vegetable and flower garden between green hayfields, small herds of sheep and cows. And every house is garlanded with flowerboxes..
Croatia has more than 1100 islands, 60 of which are inhabited. It is awesome how many small protected bays there are along the coast, chock full of motor and sailboats. No wonder Croatia has become a country for tourism, with its pristine waters. There is very little industry to pollute the waters compared to other sea coasts.
(more…)

Time Out in Slovenia

It was a brilliant decision to cancel our two-day holiday in Venice and stay here at the ranch. It’s a chance to relax in this sweet paradise and to work on projects. I was up at 6:00 a.m. – the latest I have slept since arriving, to enjoy the early morning quiet. We had coffee again on the patio in front of the house with the cats and dog and worked all day on our computers. Andre made an appointment for me at a local spa which would have been very welcome, but also irresponsible, considering I am working on material for the Institute of Interspecies Communication for Wisdom University and our new TTouch for Healthcare website, besides keeping up this journal for Kim Carneal who is also helping me figure out my new My Space. It is so much fun to share our travels.

rejuvenation - early morning coffee in slovenia Roland and I with this lovely dog that Darja rescued from a shelter.

rejuvination - early morning coffee in slovenia Roland and I with this lovely dog that Darja rescued from a shelter.

 

 

© Linda Tellington-Jones 2008

Introducing Baron and Baroness Vojnika

After a good night’s sleep, I awoke just before 6:00 a.m. and brought my computer down to work in the dining room so Roland could continue sleeping. Fifteen year-old Alijaz was in the kitchen getting ready to go to school with his sister, Manca.

The sky was heavy with dark rain-filled clouds hanging over the forest. Before I started typing I needed to soak my hand in hot water to supple it and get the circulation going. I stood out on the balcony with my hand in a pot of hot water and watched the horses in the meadow below the house. Three grey mares were lying in a circle, surrounded by three pitch-black horses, like in a painting. But when they heard us, they got up and began to graze. Bonnie, the lovely Lipizzaner mare I was photographed with yesterday for a woman’s magazine, came up the hill and began eating apples off the ground. She is pregnant with a foal by the Lipizzaner stallion Maj.

As I began to write, a clap of thunder shook the house, the sky opened and a deluge of rain pounded down on the tile roof. My Mother used to say that under is the sound of angels with bowling balls.

I felt I was witnessing a miracle! Rain and wind had been predicted for every one of the past four days, but we had only sun and slight breeze. Friday, Saturday and Sunday it was hot – in the 80’s but still pleasant with a breeze. Andre said he ordered the rain to start Sunday evening around 8 p.m. so the guests would not stay too late after dinner and accordion music.

5:00 p.m. The Hot Air Balloon Ride right from the ranch took place on schedule.

 

Bon Voyage Linda & Roland with Manca Znidersic and our trusty pilot

Bon Voyage Linda & Roland with Manca Znidersic and our trusty pilot

 

Our Hot Air Balloon ready to fly

Our Hot Air Balloon ready to fly

 

 

Kaja & Grom Ranch from the air. The road leading in and out of the property is a charming winding gravel road.

Kaja & Grom Ranch from the air. The road leading in and out of the property is a charming winding gravel road.

The clouds that had darkened the sky all day blew by, the sun came out and suddenly the day was sparkling for our balloon ride.
It was fascinating to learn that two French brothers whose business was silk and papermaking had the idea that a flame inside a bag would cause it to rise up into the sky. Their first liftoff was 600 meters over Paris in the late 1700’s. I didn’t realize that ballooning has a tradition of graduation. After first flight, one receives a beautiful certificate hand scribed and sealed with a flourish of hot wax. Because ballooning was originally a sport for royals, Roland and I were given the titles of Baron and Baroness Vojnika (from the village closest to the ranch). We were asked to kneel on a rug and were “officially knighted” by our pilot and then drank champagne together. Since I did not receive a certificate for my flight in Kenya over 18 years ago, this was counted as my first official flight!

 

At the end of our balloon ride Roland and I were presented with beautiful Certificate on parchment, dubbing us Baron and Baroness Vojnika with a special wax seal to commemorate the act. This was my second balloon trip - the first being in Kenya when we dipped over the Mara river just barely clearing several crocs and a herd of hippos.

At the end of our balloon ride Roland and I were presented with beautiful Certificate on parchment, dubbing us Baron and Baroness Vojnika with a special wax seal to commemorate the act. This was my second balloon trip - the first being in Kenya when we dipped over the Mara river just barely clearing several crocs and a herd of hippos.

 

 

© Linda Tellington-Jones 2008

Kaja & Grom Ranch, Slovenia

9:30 a.m. Visit to Rok & Victoria’s new veterinary hospital in Celje. 

It is wonderful to see the thought they have given to making the clinic not just practical, but also inviting for clients and their dogs and cats. The rooms are painted in beautiful alkaline colors of of green and blue with a balance of acid magenta and orange – colors I learned from Edgar Cayce teachings that balance our mental and physical health. There is a separate waiting room for the cats so they will not be stressed by dogs, and many of the fish in the tank at the reception have names.

Early saturday we made a visit to the Zvitorepka Veterinary Center. Their name means "fox" and they certainly love animals. We had a tour of the newly opened center and were very impressed with their use of color to stimulate healing and their attention to so many small details around the treatment and waiting rooms. They even have a separate waiting room for dogs and cats and other small critters so they wont stress each other. L to R Roland, Dr. Rok Kramnik, Linda, Dr. Victoria Luncaric, Dr. Claudia  Ashempiger and their vet tech

3:00 P.M. I had an interview with Slovenia’s leading woman’s magazine that was different and fun. The reporter wanted to hear some stories about people and animals and TTouch for Humans. She was interested to hear how we teach couples to give their partner the type of TTouch and pressure they enjoy and how common it is to find that one partner enjoys the lightness of a number two pressure and the other can’t feel much less than a six. It is such a joy and a gift to bring an awareness of each other’s needs so they can communicate nonverbally in a new and deeper and more satisfying way. Interesting that it is not always the wife or female partner who finds a lighter touch the most desirable.

Simon Dvorsak conducting the Symphony Orchestra Domzale-Kamnik in the arena on the opening day

Simon Dvorsak conducting the Symphony Orchestra Domzale-Kamnik in the arena on the opening day

Andre Znidersic presenting the Spanish walk with the Lippizaner stallion while the orchestra plays in the background.

Andre Znidersic presenting the Spanish walk with the Lippizaner stallion while the orchestra plays in the background

Andrej Znidarsic lead Nika Lipota into the arena on horseback to perform her ballet. Nika has been a returning student to Kaja & Grom Ranch summer programs for many years.

Andrej Znidarsic lead Nika Lipota into the arena on horseback to perform her ballet. Nika has been a returning student to Kaja & Grom Ranch summer programs for many years.

Nika performs for the Opening of the new Kaja & Grom Ranch and TTEAM/Animal Ambassador Center. I love this photo with the horse trailer from one of the ranch sponsors of the background. What a small world. this trailer in Slovenia is manufactured by Buchmann, a German family I have known for 30 years.

Nika performs for the Opening of the new Kaja & Grom Ranch and TTEAM/Animal Ambassador Center. I love this photo with the horse trailer from one of the ranch sponsors of the background. What a small world. this trailer in Slovenia is manufactured by Buchmann, a German family i have known for 30 years.

5:00 p.m. An Evening of Culture at the Ranch

For the 3rd day the stands were full with 120 in attendance for the official opening of the ranch by the mayor of Vojnika, Benjamin Podrgajs, Darja and Andre’s children, Manca and Aljaz rode in on two attractive pitch-black Lipizzaner/Arabian cross horses holding a red ribbon between them. The mayor cut the ribbon symbolizing the official opening. Simon, the conductor of the 40-piece symphony orchestra; 14-year-old Nika Lipota who danced ballet; and violinist, 15-year-old Nika Goldnik all rode into the arena on horseback to begin their presentations.

Kaja & Grom/TTouch student Nika Goldnik entertains the 100 plus guests as she is led into the arena to join the orchestra.

Kaja & Grom/TTouch student Nika Goldnik entertains the 100 plus guests as she is led into the arena to join the orchestra.

L to R. Roland Kleger (my husband), LTJ, Dr. Luka Krusic, Darja Znidarsic and behind is Andrej Znidarsic. We are standing in a unique  stall made of rock salt crystal in the holistic veterinary center of Dr. Krusic. Dr. Krusic specializes in racing horses - both Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds and asked me to consult with him on a puzzling case of a 4 year old Standardbred mare who was given to him because she could not be trained to harness.

L to R. Roland Kleger (my husband), LTJ, Dr. Luka Krusic, Darja Znidarsic and behind is Andrej Znidarsic. We are standing in a unique stall made of rock salt crystal in the holistic veterinary center of Dr. Krusic. Dr. Krusic specializes in racing horses - both Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds and asked me to consult with him on a puzzling case of a 4 year old Standardbred mare who was given to him because she could not be trained to harness.

Dedication of the new center

On the stage was a stand holding a hand-carved wooden sign covered by a brown cowhide that reads International Animal Ambassador and TTeam Center Slovenia with the TTouch Logo in the center under Kaja & Grom Ranch – Tellington TTouch Training. Roland and I undraped the sign and Darja and Andre gave a presentation to the visitors of their programs and intentions for the future cooperation of Animal Ambassadors with Italy and other countries in Europe.


As a special surprise to us Lucka danced a lovely hula. Darja’s mother had prepared special traditional Slovenian cakes and sandwiches for all 100 visitors and the mayor invited us with a dozen of Darja and Andre’s friends for another delicious dinner in his village that is just a short drive through the woods from the ranch.

The teenagers relaxing after helping to prepare the arena for the event!

The teenagers relaxing after helping to prepare the arena for the event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Linda Tellington-Jones 2008

TTouch for Dogs Seminar in Slovenia

img_9741

Each of the 100 participants in the day-long the dog seminar received a beautiful handout. Here are the colorful folders with paw prints in the corner of the sunlit dining room.

Each of the 100 participants in the day-long the dog seminar received a beautiful handout. Here are the colorful folders with paw prints in the corner of the sunlit dining room.

What a day this was! Ninety-six people signed up for the dog seminar including folks from Croatia and Italy and one woman who drove all the way from Denmark with her two dogs just for the day. It was perfect weather – about 74 degrees. Andrea built wooden stands with three tiers so there was excellent viewing for everyone under a 66′ x 80′ steel-framed tent. A soft breeze wafting through the surrounding woods kept everyone comfortable.

 Participants learning the TTouch tempo on their arms

Participants learning the TTouch tempo on their arms

The Dogs
I worked with 6 dogs. Misa, a 25 pound terrier/cocker mix who is afraid of loud noises, lacked self-confidence and was sometimes startled by her own shadow. Tina had been advised to ignore the behavior, so Misa didn’t have a lot of support or guidance. It was a pleasure working with them and we sent her home with TTouches and tips.
Zara, a large, black Great Dane bitch, was the second dog. Tereza got her at 2 months old last March and immediately enrolled her in Play School. But it was play with Tereza, not other dogs, and she had no chance to interact with other dogs because she was just too big for them. Tereza had attempted to take her to puppy kindergarten but something had always interfered – a flood of the school or bad weather, and as Zara grew she began to snarl back at other dogs apparently snarled at her because of her size. Tereza was advised to shout at Zara when she snarled, but had not done so because it didn’t make sense to her. With a Halti she could turn Zara away and keep her from jumping at other dogs, but felt a lot of stress because so many people were afraid of her size.

This Great Dane was nervous of other dogs so we lead her through the labyrinth in the "Homing Pigeon" between 2 people.  I stroke her down the front leg to ground her while a quiet "neutral" dog sits at a safe distance.

This Great Dane was nervous of other dogs so we lead her through the labyrinth in the "Homing Pigeon" between 2 people. I stroke her down the front leg to ground her while a quiet "neutral" dog sits at a safe distance.

Because she had only a line to the Halti it was too close to her eyes and Zara’s head was pulled to one side most of the time. It was not a comfortable situation. I put the super balance on her and started in a 4-meter long labyrinth in Homing Pigeon, with the first little dog, Misa, who was very friendly with other dogs, being the neutral dog. Twice Zara made an attempt to “jump” in the direction of Misa. It was an odd half-hearted move but I could see why it concerned Tereza. With Zara sitting from time to time, and Misa working behind and in front and lots of TTouches and Ear work between, Zara and Tereza both began to relax. I took the Halti off and Zara immediately lowered her head and noticeably relaxed and she was easy to direct. I planned to work her with Leon, Darjs’s massive and super-friendly Anatolian Shepherd but the time did not allow for it.

Lunch was a tasty vegetarian soup, hardy bread and delicious Slovenian home-made cheese cake, and 120 people were fed and back into the arena within the allotted hour.

The first activity after lunch was TTouch for the whole class. They gathered around me in a half circle, each with a partner. I stood above the crowd on what looked like an elephant stand in a circus so everyone could follow my TTouches. I demonstrated on a volunteer.

I brought everyone out of the stands into the arena so they can practice TTouch on each other.

I brought everyone out of the stands into the arena so they can practice TTouch on each other.

Several times I mingled among the participants showing the difference between a 2 and 4 pressure and accepting their TTouches on me. At least 90% were spot-on with a 2 or 4 pressure and I was surprised how round and precise many were.

In the middle - "get in close and practice"

In the middle - "get in close and practice"

My 3rd dog was a very athletic Malinois belonging to Maja Oresnik, the leading agility trainer in Slovenia. Rick is 7 years old and after surgery for a ruptured cruciform ligament two years ago Maja said he tends to “save” the leg. I was impressed with how well he does and how tactful his trot is. I suggested she begin to appreciate the degree of his healing and how well he moves and stands — That she practice the philosophy of seeing the cup half full instead of half empty. She said she had still been thinking of Rick as a cripple. I told her about Rupert Sheldrake’s study of how dogs pick up our pictures and the idea of “seeing the perfection”. It’s a challenge often, to see our animals as they are now, and not as they were after injury.

one of the 100 plus students practicing TTouch on her dog while others practice TTouch on each other.

one of the 100 plus students practicing TTouch on her dog while others practice TTouch on each other.

Slovenian veterinarian Kristine Porenta met TTouch Practitioner Shawn Gross at a conference on the east coast of the U.S. last month and wrote to Shawn to say that I was coming to Slovenia. She has a client with a 15-month-old Swiss Mountain dog and was hoping that TTouch might offer some help for the dog. I had to tell her that TTouch is not magic and perhaps she could help to a small degree to reduce some of her pain, but I recommend that the dog be fitted with a cart before her joints give out and create more pain. She was apparently on a lot of pain medication, which can cause her to overuse herself in my opinion. The webs of her front feet were widely spread and her body was twisted in an attempt to hold her weight on her left hind leg. The kindest thing in my opinion would be to allow her to pass into Doggy heaven, but that is such a difficult decision for many dog owners to make, and the veterinarian cannot make it for them. When I asked for any further input one of the experienced dog people in the seminar also recommended that they get a cart as soon as possible and before she suffers any more breakdowns.

© Linda Tellington-Jones 2008

Tag Cloud